Forster-Tuncurry to Port Macquarie

 

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Forster-Tuncurry; Port Macquarie

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Forster-Tuncurry; Port Macquarie

These tourist resort centres are seated within easy reach of Sydney on the northern coast of New South Wales. Both have an excellent facilities for the holidaymaker fishermen .

The waterways of Wallis Lake offers excellent fishing and have made one of the largest oyster-producing areas in the state (the Forster-Tuncurry region). There are also some beaches for rock fishing and a prolific grounds of prawn in the estuary. Locations described below include The Step, The Stockyards, Bandicoot Island, Nine Mile Beach, Tuncurry, Cape Hawke and Elizabeth and Shelley Beaches.

The centre of one popular holiday spots in the state is the Historic Town of Port Macquarie. Fishermen are well catered for with top lake, surf estuary and rock fishing which is readily available in this region. Some of the best fishing regions are North Wall, Limebumers Creek, Hastings River, Pelican Island, Point Plomer and Lake Cathie.

The Step

This drop-off area in the main estuary channel is a known location for flathead. Bream can also be spotted at any time of the year. The peak season is between April and May.

The Stockyards

This location around the Forster-Tuncurry Bridge is a good location to take blackfish. Catches of 50 fish or more are not uncommon during the run.

Tuncurry

Most of the fishing in this area is done from the breakwater which hauls bream, flathead and tailor. This is also a popular spot when the mullet run is on. The Nine Mile Beach offers a superb surf fishing.

Bandicoot Island

This island is surrounded with sand spits and channels, an abundant spot for flathead and whiting. The islands also have plentiful prawning grounds during summer months.

Nine Mile Beach

Towards north from Tuncurry to Black Head, this beach yields well for whiting and flathead from November to March. Tailor and bream are taken during winter.

Cape Hawke

This area is known for big specimens. Rock blackfish can be found in the gutters on the south side of the headland. Large jewfish and kingfish are also good catches from the rocks.

Elizabeth and Shelley Beaches

Tailor, salmon and jewfish can be taken from the rocks, most especially during a strong southerly blow.

North Wall, Port Macquarie

The northern part of the seawall is a god spot for tailor on the incoming tide and is a favorite shelter for jewfish on the run-out tide at night.

Hastings River

The mouth of the river is the best spot, especially in autumn and winter. On the ebb-tide bream and luderick are caught, while tailor on the rising tide.

Pelican Island

The extensive sandflats in this area make it a good spot to take whiting and flathead in summer.

Limeburners Creek

Boat anglers can yield luderick and bream in the channel. Further upstream, the Hibbard Shore is a good spot for bream and flathead.

Point Plomer

Snapper can be sought in the reefs off this location. Small marlin have also taken out from the northern beach close to Point Plomer.

Lake Cathie

Is located in the south of Port Macquarie, this estuary yields best when the lake opens to the sea after a closed period. Luderick are caught in big hauls during these conditions.

 

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